Educational YouTube channels Real Engineering and Real Science produce topical and in-depth videos on science, engineering, and technology and enjoy a broad audience of young scientists, engineers, and enthusiasts, with collectively over three million subscribers.

The team behind Real Engineering and Real Science is looking for specialist writers who can produce accurate, well-researched scripts of 10–20 minutes on a variety of science- and engineering-related topics. Areas of coverage for Real Engineering currently include renewables, aviation, materials science, mechanics, and more; Areas of coverage for Real Science currently include health and medicine, marine biology, genetics, and more. …


By Stephanie Sammann

An illustration with a yellow overlay depicting divers exploring a sunken ship.
An illustration with a yellow overlay depicting divers exploring a sunken ship.
Divers explore the wreckage of the SS Carnatic in the Red Sea, Egypt. (Image: W.Strickling / Wikimedia Commons; Illustration: MODULUS)

The ocean is a magnificent, inhospitable place. Cold, dark, and violent, it is an environment that people have contended with for as long as humanity has existed.

Despite its unforgiving nature, much of our civilization relies on conquering these harsh conditions. Many have traversed the ocean surface, but only relatively recently have we begun to grapple with the final frontier of the sea: the deep.

As you descend deeper and deeper into the ocean, the laws of physics are instantly and harshly working against you. …


By Brian McManus and Erica Corder

A old photo with the beginnings of the Sagrada Família’s construction in the background.
A old photo with the beginnings of the Sagrada Família’s construction in the background.
The Sagrada Família during construction in 1905. (Image: Baldomer Gili i Roig / Wikimedia Commons; Illustration: MODULUS)

Barcelona is a city characterized by regimental city blocks and wide, linear streets — an orderly departure from the narrow, winding streets of most European cities.


By Brian McManus and Erica Corder

A fleet of tanks rolls across a battlefield .
A fleet of tanks rolls across a battlefield .
M4 Sherman tanks deployed in Europe. (Image: U.S. Government / Illustration: MODULUS)

The United States had yet to gain a foothold in their tank development and manufacturing when World War II began.

As the country and its allies watched France fall to an aggressive German advance in 1940, the U.S. recognized it was time to develop an agile, well-armored, and reliable tank model capable of competing with the feared German tanks.

And they needed it fast, cheap, and easy to manufacture.

In July 1940, the U.S. debuted a proposal for a new Medium Tank model, the M3. Intended to be a stopgap solution, the U.S. Department…


By Stephanie Sammann and Erica Corder

An up-close view of blood cells, with a transparent yellow overlay.
An up-close view of blood cells, with a transparent yellow overlay.
Electron micrograph of red blood cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria in humans. (Image: Rick Fairhurst and Jordan Zuspann, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, U.S. National Institutes of Health / Illustration: MODULUS)

We don’t hear much about malaria in Western media, unless we’re talking about how it’s impacting tropical or humid regions elsewhere. But places like the U.S. and Europe used to be riddled with the mosquito-borne disease.

In the U.S., in particular, it debilitated towns, caused thousands of deaths, and even determined the settlement patterns of the country. But now, it has been so thoroughly erased that many people don’t even know it used to exist here at all.

As of 2017, 87 countries had ongoing malaria transmission, a majority of which are in Southeast…


By Brian McManus and Erica Corder

A blue-tinted illustration depicting a bag valve mask ventilator system.
A blue-tinted illustration depicting a bag valve mask ventilator system.
An early prototype for the MIT E-Vent, an open-source bag valve mask ventilator design. (Image: MIT / Illustration: MODULUS)

When COVID-19 struck, projected demand for ventilators spiked.

Fears spread that there simply weren’t enough to treat the critically-ill patients whose lungs were failing them as a result of COVID-19. Desperate, governments around the world put out calls to manufacturers to make more.

Existing ventilator manufacturers began working overtime to attempt to meet the demand. Still, the complexity of devices and the all-out scramble to find parts amid a breaking-down supply chain meant even the pros had trouble ramping up production. …

MODULUS

To measure is to know.

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